Scientific Infomation


USC researchers help reveal deadly starfish secrets

6 APRIL 2017 Unniversity of the Sunshine Coast research led by Associate Professor of Molecular Biology Scott Cummins has contributed to a breakthrough discovery that could protect the Great Barrier Reef from the coral-killing crown-of-thorns starfish. Four USC researchers including Dr Cummins are co-authors of the paper, ‘Genome sequencing of the coral reef predator crown-of-thorns starfish’, newly-published ...

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Balancing hydropower and biodiversity in the Amazon, Congo, and Mekong basins

Inga Dam on the Congo River. Image: International Rivers | Flickr | Creative Commons A boom in construction of major hydroelectric dam projects on the Amazon, Congo and Mekong rivers increasingly threatens a range of rare and unique freshwater biodiversity according to a new study published inScience. Existing dams on the three basins are generally small and located in upland tributaries, but over ...

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Mekong River Basin

Problem Statement: The Mekong River in Southeast Asia is one of the most important and productive natural systems in the world. Originating in the Tibetan Plateau, it flows 4,800 km through six nations – China’s Yunnan Province, Myanmar (Burma), Laos, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia – before forming a complex delta system with several distributaries and entering the South China Sea. It provides more ...

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New method reveals high similarity between gorilla and human Y chromosome

02 March 2016 Jim (on the right), whose Y chromosome was sequenced, together with Dolly, his mother, and Binti, his sister. Credit: San Diego Zoo Global A new, less expensive, and faster method now has been developed and used to determine the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosome in the gorilla. The technique will allow better access to genetic information of the Y chromosome of any species and thus can ...

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Impact of climate change on parasite infections depends on host immunity

15 February 2016 New research demonstrates how climate change and the immune reaction of the infected individual can affect the long-term and seasonal dynamics of parasite infections. The study, led by Penn State University scientists, assessed the infection dynamics of two species of soil-transmitted parasites in a population of rabbits in Scotland every month for 23 years. The study's results could lead to new ...

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